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Report illegal botox and cosmetic fillers


It is now illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to receive botulinum toxin (botox) or fillers for cosmetic purposes, or make plans or book an appointment to do so.

Registered doctors, nurses, dentists and pharmacists can still provide treatments to under 18s, but only in cases where the treatment has been approved by a doctor.

The law

The Botulinum Toxin and Cosmetic Fillers (Children) Act states that it is: 

  • a criminal offence to administer botulinum toxin, or a filler, by way of injection, for a cosmetic purpose to a person aged under 18 in England
  • an offence to make arrangements for, or book an appointment to provide, these treatments to any person under 18 aged in England

A parent or guardian cannot give permission for a person under the age of 18 to have the treatments.

The following treatments are covered by the law:

Botulinum toxins (botox)

Medicines injected into the skin to smooth lines and wrinkles.

Cosmetic fillers

Gel-like substances commonly injected into the lips and face to add volume to the injected area and to alter the appearance of a person. They may also be used in hands, feet or non-surgical nose jobs. 

Who the law applies to

  • Providers of cosmetic procedures such as beauty therapists, mobile aesthetic practitioners and regulated healthcare professionals (dentist, nurses and pharmacists)
  • Individuals performing the procedures on an informal basis
  • Providers of clinical healthcare services and regulated healthcare professionals working in these services.

Why the law has been introduced

The law safeguards children and young people from the potential health risks of botox and cosmetic fillers and provides the highest possible level of protection by ensuring that treatments are only available following an assessment by a doctor and performed by a regulated healthcare professional.

Some cosmetic treatments, if not carried out correctly, can carry risks to physical health including infection, blindness and, in rare cases, death.

There are also psychological risks associated with changing physical appearance. Children and young people are more vulnerable as they are developing physically and mentally, and there are ethical implications around the extent to which why can give informed consent to procedures.

Report your concerns

If you are aware of a business or individual who is providing treatments or making appointments to provide treatments to anyone under the age of 18, please contact us.

Contact us
Trading Standards
03000 261 016
Our address is:
  • Community Protection
  • PO Box 617
  • Durham
  • County Durham
  • United Kingdom
  • DH1 9HZ